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How do you get it?

Type 1 diabetes develops suddenly. We don’t know exactly what causes it. It may be genetic, or the result of an immune system that has gone wrong.

There are two main causes of type 2 diabetes, also known as insulin resistance: These are an unhealthy lifestyle due to poor diet and lack of exercise, and/or a genetic cause for diabetes.

Can it be prevented?

Type 1 diabetes cannot be prevented as it is genetic or a problem with your immune system but Type 2 diabetes can be prevented and sometimes be reversed. By cutting down on sugar, losing weight and being more active, we can keep our blood sugar levels in the normal range. This can prevent the development of diabetes or it can delay the onset of diabetes. But this may not be permanent.

How do you test for it?

The most common test for diabetes is a simple screening test, using a drop of blood from a pinprick. If this indicates a risk of diabetes you will need one of four simple blood tests that are used to measure the amount of sugar in our blood. A laboratory report will show whether our blood sugar is in the normal range or too high.

diabetes 3 get checked go collect-min

How do you get it?

Type 1 diabetes develops suddenly. We don’t know exactly what causes it. It may be genetic, or the result of an immune system that has gone wrong.

There are two main causes of type 2 diabetes, also known as insulin resistance: These are an unhealthy lifestyle due to poor diet and lack of exercise, and/or a genetic cause for diabetes.

Can it be prevented?

Type 1 diabetes cannot be prevented as it is genetic or a problem with your immune system but Type 2 diabetes can be prevented and sometimes be reversed. By cutting down on sugar, losing weight and being more active, we can keep our blood sugar levels in the normal range. This can prevent the development of diabetes or it can delay the onset of diabetes. But this may not be permanent.

How do you test for it?

The most common test for diabetes is a simple screening test, using a drop of blood from a pinprick. If this indicates a risk of diabetes you will need one of four simple blood tests that are used to measure the amount of sugar in our blood. A laboratory report will show whether our blood sugar is in the normal range or too high.

What about diabetes and COVID-19?

The WHO has advised that people with diabetes are more vulnerable to COVID-19 infection and are more likely to become very ill if they do contract the Coronavirus. If your diabetes is untreated, your weakened immune system can make you more susceptible to an infection like COVID-19.

That is why it is more important than ever to continue taking your diabetes medication. If you think you may have diabetes, get checked and if necessary, start treatment as soon as possible.

If you are stable on your medication, ask your nurse about registering for the CCMDD service so that you can collect your medicine quickly and easily from over 200 pick-up points around Durban.

What about diabetes and COVID-19?

The WHO has advised that people with diabetes are more vulnerable to COVID-19 infection and are more likely to become very ill if they do contract the Coronavirus. If your diabetes is untreated, your weakened immune system can make you more susceptible to an infection like COVID-19.

That is why it is more important than ever to continue taking your diabetes medication. If you think you may have diabetes, get checked and if necessary, start treatment as soon as possible.

If you are stable on your medication, ask your nurse about registering for the CCMDD service so that you can collect your medicine quickly and easily from over 200 pick-up points around Durban.

With support from the U.S President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief through the National Department of Health.

dept of health gov RSA Get Checked Go Collect Partners
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Health Systems Trust Get Checked Go Collect Partners